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Seatree Cosmetics 100% natural soap handmade in devon
Here at Seatree Cosmetics, we cannot stop talking about glycerin. We love the stuff. That’s why we keep all of our glycerin in our products.  
 
But what makes it so great? 

Why Glycerin soap is so great 

The reason glycerin in soap is so great is that it is a humectant.  
 
Humectants are ingredients that are used in the cosmetic industry to draw moisture into your skin. 
 
If you think of most moisturising cream, they contain glycerin which is why your skin feels so soft and moisture-rich after you use them. 
 
A lot of the glycerin produced in the world comes from the soap industry, where they remove it from their soaps to use in their moisturisers.  
 
If you really think about it, as a business it makes sense as they can now sell you soap to dry out your skin and then a moisturiser to put the moisture back in.  
 
Here at Seatree Cosmetics we think that is ethically dishonest, so we keep all of ours in our product and don’t separate it. 
 

more glycerin occurs in 100% natural soap 

Unlike the mass produced soap that you can pick off the shelf at your local supermarket, when we make our natural soap we leave it alone to cure to allow it time to turn into a beautifully moisturising soap bar.  
 
What some of the larger soap companies do is they separate the glycerin from the soap. 
 
To remove the glycerin from the soap, they add the soap with glycerin into salt water; which is why you will see sodium chloride (salt) on the ingredients list of your soap. 
 
Once the soap is added to the salt water it makes soap curdle (similar to cheese). They can then remove the curds (soap) from the salt water, which they can melt and put back together later, which is what you will buy in the shops.  
 
After removing the curds from the salt water all that remains, is the glycerin in the salt water.  
 
Now the salt will not be absorbed into the glycerin so now it is a simple process of boiling the water until it evaporates off and you are left with beautiful moisturising glycerin. 
 
This glycerin is now ready to go into your moisturisers and a host of other products including toothpaste, pharmaceuticals, ice cream, frozen yoghurt, make-up and dynamite. 

humectants draw moisture to your skin 

The reason we like humectants in our skin care products is that they draw moisture to the skin, leaving it feeling soft and nourished. In this study on glycerin it points out that glycerin has the most beneficial properties for the skin when the product contains between 5-20% glycerin.  
 
It's good to know that science backs up our claims about glycerin and that our products fall within this range! 
 
When we wash with common soaps and shower gels that you can buy over the counter, it contains some harsh detergents such as Sodium Lauryl Sulphate.  
 
This harsh detergent gets rid of oil and grease from our skin. But that includes all the good grease that our skin produces. This natural grease called sebum, plugs the gaps in between skin cells. 
 
When the SLS washes away the good oil and grease from the gaps, the allows water to get out, and potentially infection and disease a nice wide open door to come on in. As well as letting moisture out which can lead to dry skin or even eczema
 
Using natural soap with lots of glycerin in will guarentee to keep your skin soft as the natural cleaner; coconut oil will wash away dirt and grime but not the good natural grease that we need. 
 
As well as keeping you squeaky clean, the glycerin will create a barrier which locks the moisture in, whilst also drawing moisture in from the atmosphere. 
 
Common humectants include; aloe vera gel, honey, molasses, panthenol (pro vitamin b5), eggs, seaweed, beeswax and of course glycerin which is naturally produced during the soap making process. 
 
We hope you have enjoyed our blog post on glycerin, and why it's so great. Please feel free to share it to anybody who you feel could benefit from it. 
 
Also we'd like to hear what you think so please leave a comment below.  

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